Microsoft says it identified 40+ victims of the SolarWinds hack

The Security Magazine reports on notorious SolarWinds disaster.

Microsoft said it identified more than 40 of its customers that installed trojanized versions of the SolarWinds Orion platform and where hackers escalated intrusions with additional, second-stage payloads.

The OS maker said it was able to discover these intrusions using data collected by Microsoft Defender antivirus product, a free antivirus product built into all Windows installations.

Read more on the Security Magazine


Google Warns of Zero-Click Bluetooth Flaws in Linux-based Devices

The Hacker News reported on a new set of vulnerabilities in the Linux Bluetooth Software set.

Google security researchers are warning of a new set of zero-click vulnerabilities in the Linux Bluetooth software stack that can allow a nearby unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges on vulnerable devices.

According to security engineer Andy Nguyen, the three flaws — collectively called BleedingTooth — reside in the open-source BlueZ protocol stack that offers support for many of the core Bluetooth layers and protocols for Linux-based systems such as laptops and IoT devices.

Read further on The Hacker News


Active Malware Campaign Using HTML Smuggling

The Threatpost reported on ongoing malware campaign based on HTML smuggling.

Krishnan Subramanian, security researcher with Menlo Security, told Threatpost that the campaign uncovered on Tuesday, dubbed “Duri,” has been ongoing since July.

It works like this: The attackers send victims a malicious link. Once they click on that link, a JavaScript blob technique is being used to smuggle malicious files via the browser to the user’s endpoint (i.e., HTML smuggling). Blobs, which mean “Binary Large Objects” and are responsible for holding data, are implemented by web browsers.

Read more on the Threatpost


Corporate VPNs in danger as vishing attacks target home workers

SC Media published a report on current situation with cyberattack on remote workers using VPNs to connect to corporate networks.

Multiple hacking gangs are preying on remote workforces and corporate VPNs through vishing attacks that are more efficient, dangerous and ubiquitous than ever, prompting the U.S. government to issue both a warning and advice on how to thwart them.

“The news has spread throughout the hacker community and multiple groups are now doing this,” said Allison Nixon, chief research officer at Unit 221b.

Read more on SC Media